Reference Material

The Problem:
If you have a home that was built before 1978, you want to be sure that your home stays lead-safe by preventing lead hazards from developing. Lead-based paint in poor condition or on friction or impact surfaces can create hazardous lead dust and paint chips. Check surfaces painted with lead-based paint regularly to be sure the paint isn’t becoming worn, chipped, flaking or peeling.
...and the Solution
Keep the lead-based paint in your home in good condition, and prevent surfaces that have lead-based paint from rubbing or impact.  An “Essential Maintenance Plan” (EMP) is a plan of paint inspection and maintenance that ensures that lead paint remains in good condition and doesn’t create a lead hazard. You can implement your own EMP by making a list of all lead painted surfaces in your home, inspecting them regularly, and performing “interim controls” if the paint is flaking, peeling, or cracking, or if there is dust on window sills or floors. If the paint or a building component with lead-paint on it is damaged or needs repair, follow the steps in this booklet to prevent lead hazards.

Step 1. Write down the surfaces that you know or suspect have lead-based paint on them.  It’s usually easier if you do this by room.
For example:
Living Room Family room
- west windows - painted floor
- baseboards - trim around ceiling
Kitchen Katie’s bedroom
- Baseboards - closet walls

Step 2. Inspect lead-painted surfaces regularly and use interim controls to prevent lead dust from getting into your home environment.
Interim controls are actions that you take to prevent or eliminate exposure to lead in your home. These are actions such as routine cleaning, lead-based paint repair, repainting non-friction or impact surfaces, repairing friction and impact surfaces, using bottled water, and covering bare soil.